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49th PARALLEL PROJECT

 

TEACHING AND PUBLIC ART TOURS

 

As a teaching artist I have conducted numerous workshops and residencies for students (grades 4 - 12) through schools, museums and other arts organizations. Much of the work has resulted in community-based public art projects.

 

 

H20il

Responding to Robert Glenn Ketchum’s Southwest Alaska exhibition at the Jimmy Carter Museum, students from The Galloway School created this collaborative installation. The high school students researched some of the environmental issues regarding polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles and then designed new labels.  Funding for the project was provided by Captain Planet Foundation and the work was installed in the museum in 2008.

Like the artist, Felix González-Torres, who created installations in the 1990’s that allowed viewers to leave with candy or posters that physically comprised the artwork, the students encourage viewers to depart this installation and contemplate the environmental impact of these ubiquitous bottles.  When museum patrons removed a bottle from the stone map of Alaska formed on the museum floor, their impact was recorded by leaving a “borehole.”

 

 

TOM (Tower Observatory Map)

 

As part of a Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts' (DCCA) Art and Community Residency Project, I collaborated with ten teenagers to  create a 32-foot diameter map of the greater Wilmington area.  Upon completion, the tower was open to the public for several days. Visitors were allowed to enter the map and carefully walk through the installation.

Constructed of sticks and stones, TOM incorporated landmarks seen from the tower (indicated by upright stones) along with a variety of unseen landmarks of significance to the teens (indicated by flat rocks).  Symbols were painted onto the rocks that represent various locations: hospitals, apartment buildings, laboratories, schools, favorite restaurants, cinemas, etc.  Rivers were indicated with crushed rock. All the materials used were found in the park (except for the acrylic paint).  A stone representing the Rockford Park Tower was located at the center of the installation and the map was properly oriented to the land it represented visable thorught the adjacent windows.  One foot on the map equaled one kilometer (.62 mile) of terrain.  A ten-mile radius from Rockford Park was depicted.

 

 

 

US Map

Fourth grade students from Mimosa Elementary School in Roswell, Ga. created political and physical maps of the continental United States.  For the political map, students worked collaboratively on the clay map and selected regional colors to correspond with the teaching sections of their social studies curriculum. Students also created individual symbols (e.g. a crab for Maryland, a race car for Indianapolis, etc.) to represent natural resources and landmarks.

Circle Map

Fourth grade students from High Meadows School created a 45-foot diameter map of the 30th through 35th parallels (roughly Georgia's north and south borders) using materials found on the school grounds.  Dirt represented the continents, sticks -the oceans, sand - deserts, green pine needles- forested area, and pine cones - areas of oil production.

 

MORE STUDENT PROJECTS